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Monday, May 6, 2013

Mazda Mazda2


The Mazda2 subcompact hatchback is the smallest car in the Mazda model range, 2 inches shorter even than the famed MX-5 Miata two-seat sports car. It lets Mazda offer a vehicle to those who need a very short car for urban parking, cost-conscious commuters, and younger drivers who want their first taste of the "Zoom-Zoom" experience. But it's a very basic, simple car, and it competes against a...


The Mazda2 subcompact hatchback is the smallest car in the Mazda model range, 2 inches shorter even than the famed MX-5 Miata two-seat sports car. It lets Mazda offer a vehicle to those who need a very short car for urban parking, cost-conscious commuters, and younger drivers who want their first taste of the "Zoom-Zoom" experience. But it's a very basic, simple car, and it competes against a list of vehicles that offer far wider features sets and greater performance. Those include the Ford Fiesta, Toyota Yaris, Honda Fit, Chevrolet Sonic (Aveo), Hyundai Accent, and Kia Rio.

First launched as a 2011 model, the Mazda 2 is both the most affordable car from its maker and a less-expensive hatchback. The next car up in the line, the Mazda3 compact, charges more for its five-door hatchback than the entry-level four-door sedan--but the smaller Mazda2 only comes as a hatchback.

The Mazda2's stark interior and simplicity can remind us a bit too much of older, simpler small cars. Some of those attributes include its short wheelbase, which produces fore-and-aft bobbing on choppy highway surfaces, and the many hard-and-hollow trims found inside--more than many alternative vehicles of the same price and size.

In appearance, the Mazda2 follows Mazda's current design direction quite closely, with a simple, neat look overall and a front end that's a more modest iteration of the brand's 'grinning' look. Mechanically, the front-wheel-drive Mazda2 has what sounds like an old-school economy-car powertrain—a 100-hp, 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine, and a five-speed manual gearbox or four-speed automatic. But thanks to great steering and suspension tuning—as well as a light, 2,300-pound curb weight—we've found the Mazda2 to be a lot of fun to drive, especially in the city.

The Mazda2's EPA fuel economy ratings, at 27 mpg city, 34 highway with the automatic or 29/35 with the manual, probably aren't as high as most shoppers for such a frugal commuter as seeking. But in real-world driving experiences, we've however seen numbers at the higher end of that range. With the possible grafting of Mazda's 1.3-liter SkyActiv-G four-cylinder engine in the near future, the model could do even better, though.

In safety, the Mazda Mazda2 has fared reasonably well, although IIHS 'acceptable' ratings for side and rear impact haven't put this model in the top tier. All the features that are now expected, even in small cars—like stability control, anti-lock brakes, and side-curtain airbags—are included however.

The Mazda2 is a little more expensive compared to other subcompacts, and somewhat behind the curve in connectivity and features. At a time when shoppers for low-cost subcompacts are expecting some of the same connectivity features—such as basic hands-free calling—as they have in other cars, the Mazda2 doesn't include them. A USB port was added to both trim levels of the 2013 Mazda2, while Bluetooth remained a port-installed (or dealer-installed) option and navigation isn't offered.

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