Skip to main content

Ads

loading...

Featured Post

I Spit on Your Grave: Deja Vu (2019) Sinhala Subtitles

Ads

ads

Flipboard

Flipboard

Google Chromecast vs Roku Streaming Stick comparison review: is the Roku Streaming stick worth more than Google Chromecast?


If you don't have a Smart TV and are unwilling to pay the vast amounts of money to upgrade to one, then you can turn your existing HDTV into a Smart TV from as little as £30-£50 with the Google Chromecast or a Roku Streaming Stick. Here's where we find out which one is the best value in our Google Chromecast vs Roku Streaming Stick comparison review.

The way these two TV streaming sticks work are very similar, in that they are both essentially Wi-Fi dongles that plug into your TV's HDMI port, and then bring a host of apps and online content straight to your TV.

Roku announced the arrival of the Streaming Stick a short time ago, but unfortunately it will not be available to buy in the UK until late April. The Google Chromecast however is now available to buy in the UK and can be purchase via the Google Play Store and other usual retailers such as Currys, PC World and Amazon.

Neither device is particularly expensive, but the Google Chromecast is significantly the cheaper of the two, costing only £30 compared to the Roku Streaming Stick's £50 price tag.

It's tough to declare a clear winner here as both devices are still in their infancy, and while the Chromecast offers a lot of promise, it is still lacking in terms of what it offers, when compared to the Roku Streaming Stick, thanks to the ground work done by previous Roku Devices. Our instinct tells us that spending £30 on a Google device that promises to bring Smart TV services to your regular HDTV is going to prove worthwhile in the long run, but for now the extra £20 for the Roku looks like a fair price bump.


Price is obviously a major factor you should consider when deciding which of these two streaming stick you should buy, but what is probably more important, is what features the devices offer for the price.

On the face of it, these two TV streaming dongles do largely the same thing, and that is connect your TV to your local Wi-Fi network and enable playback from TV apps and local media.

The Roku Streaming Stick offers access to over 500 Smart TV services incliding Netflix, BBC iPlayer, NOW TV, 4oD, Demand 5, Sky News, Spotify, VEVO, Sky Store and Plex, to name but a few. Locally stored content can be streamed directly via the Roku app.

Unfortunately as Google Chromecast has only recently been launched, there are only a limited number of services available to UK users; these include: Netflix, BBC iPlayer, YouTube, Google Play Movies, TV & Music, Red Bull TV, VEVO, Plex and Real Cloud Player. This is a list that we expect to grow rapidly once video content providers catch up with the Google Chromecast stick.

In order to get video content from your mobile devices (smartphones and tablets) working wirelessly via the Chromecast dongle, you have to purchase either the AllCast Premium or Plex for Android apps. Both these apps cost £3 and work with Chromecast, however, from our experience the playback is a bit glitchy. We'd have loved to have seen an official Google Chromecast app that played local media content from a smartphone or tablet. This would have made it a real rival to the functionality of the much more expensive Apple TV, and also a more desirable streaming dongle all-round.


The major difference between these two streaming devices is that Roku Streaming Stick comes with a physical remote control plus iOS/Android app support. It uses an on-screen interface to browse content.

Meanwhile the Chromecast relies on devices such as Android smartphones and tablets to be controlled. It also supports iPhone, iOS, PC and Mac (via Chrome) and Chome OS devices. Instead of using an interface, you simply choose what content to view via the Chromecast on your device and hit play.

See all digital home review.


There's not a lot we can say here really. Both of these streaming dongles look pretty similar and ugly. The trouble with these devices is that the idea is for them to be hidden behind your TV, however they still need to be big enough for their Wi-Fi receivers to work properly. The result is the classic looking dongle. Pretty boring really.


Comments

ads

loading...
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Loading...

Popular posts from this blog

Game Of Thrones Season 8 - End Game With Sinhala Subtitles

Nokia 7.1 Review

With Android One, great build quality and a sensible price the Nokia 7.1 is a winner in a crowded market. Here's our full review
Should I buy the Nokia 7.1?
The Nokia 7.1 is a familiar mid-range phone for the end of 2018: a notch, big bottom chin and dual cameras. But these cameras are pretty good, and the display is lovely.Its build quality is above average though, and with Android One on board and decent performance it’s an excellent mid-range phone with the advantage of three years of guaranteed security updates.

Nokia 7.1 Review: Hands-on

With Android One, great build quality and a sensible price the Nokia 7.1 could be a winner in a crowded market. Here's our hands on review By Henry Burrell | 5 hours ago
The Nokia 7.1 is a familiar mid-range phone for the end of 2018: a notch, big bottom chin and dual cameras.

Mark Zuckerberg Builds A Sleep Box For Wife To Have A Peaceful Sleep

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg expressed his love and gratitude by making an innovative wooden ‘sleep box’ for his wife Priscilla to have a peaceful sleep at night. The American tech entrepreneur, took his Instagram account and showed off his invention that helps his wife to sleep peacefully through the night as she cares for their children. The invention is known as the sleep box and emits a faint light between 6 am and 7 am so, Priscilla Chan can know that their two toddler daughters are about to wake up, without the need to have to check her phone.

Disney Plus Release Date, Price, Exclusive Shows & UK Launch

Here's what to expect from Disney's upcoming Netflix rival Disney+, including when it's launching, how much it'll cost, and what you'll be able to watch on it
Disney is the latest company to wade into the film and TV streaming game with Disney+ - or Disney Plus if you prefer - a new streaming service that will let you watch all of the Mouse House's best and brightest in one place.

Like Fan Page