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Red Wine-Braised Pork

This basic braised pork shoulder recipe is a great foundation for all sorts of meals. Try it in our creamy cavatelli pasta (see Associated Recipes), stuffed into a sandwich with provolone and peppers or on top of a pizza.

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How To Use A VPN


VPNs are becoming more and more widely used so we've put together a quick guide on what they are and how they work, for your anonymous browsing pleasure.

VPNs are growing in popularity, perhaps as a reaction to security fears online, but perhaps also because it can help you watch streaming services like Netflix or BBC iPlayer from another country. We explain how to set up and use a VPN on your PC.

First, let us briefly explain what a VPN is and how it works is to get you started. VPN stands for virtual private network and there are several reasons why you might want to use one. 

One is that a VPN prevents people from spying on you while you use the internet, and this is useful if you travel with a laptop, smartphone or tablet and access WiFi hotspots in public places. It does the same thing when you're using the internet at home, or in the office.

A VPN can also be used to make it appear as if you are located in another country. This can unlock services that are blocked from your real location, for example, you can watch catch-up TV like BBC iPlayer while on holiday or a business trip abroad. Some VPNs even let you watch US Netflix in the UK - we've rounded up the best VPNs for streaming here, if you know that's why you want to use one.

There are many VPN services available, and most require a subscription. We have a separate articles that shares our favourite VPNs, but our top pick is NordVPN, which we use here to illustrate how to set up and use a VPN.

How To Use A VPN
The first thing you'll need to do in order to start using a VPN is to sign up for the service of your choice and download it. If you've chosen NordVPN, go to its website and click Buy Now. Most VPN services have three tiers depending on how long you want to commit for, and most have a money back guarantee that'll reassure you if you aren’t completely sure whether a VPN is going to work for you.

Once you've signed up, you'll need to download and install the app on your Mac or PC. Then, launch the app to get started.
Once the app is open, you'll want to choose a server to connect to. You might see a list of countries or a map. In the case of NordVPN you can choose to see the servers in either view.

The location of the server you connect to is then your virtual location, meaning the internet thinks that you are in that location right now. That's why the server you choose will largely depend on what you want to use the VPN for.

If you want to connect to US Netflix you'll need to choose a US-based server, or for BBC iPlayer you'll need a UK-based server. Of course, it's important to note that doing so goes against both services terms and conditions so do so at your own discretion.

Once you've chosen which server suits you best, you'll need to connect to it. NordVPN has a big button at the top that allows you to connect to the server when you're ready and disable the connection at any time.

Many VPN services have a kill switch that will terminate your connection and continue to protect your privacy if the VPN server itself gets disconnected too.

To test whether the connection is working, you can use BrowserSPY's Geolocation page to see where your IP address location is. It should be roughly the location of the server you chose, rather than your actual location. If it is, your VPN is working.



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